Alzheimer's, Dementia & Memory Care

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At Heritage Place we understand that each person living with memory loss experiences its symptoms and progression differently. We understand the varying stages of memory loss, and design programs and activities to address every stage for each individual – enabling us to meet each resident’s needs at the right time.

Memory care at Heritage Place is provided by a compassionate care staff who undergo specialized Alzheimer’s and dementia care training on an ongoing basis. Understanding how Alzheimer’s disease affects the brain helps each caregiver better understand behaviors, communication barriers and the overall needs of each resident. The unique and effective training series we provide helps support our staff and those entrusted to our care. We encourage you to stop by view our welcoming environment with our friendly caregivers in action 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

 

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Medication Management

Adults 65 and older use more medicine daily than any other age group in the United States.


Meal Preparation

Mental and social stimulation are key for someone dealing with an Alzheimer's diagnosis.


Medical Transporation

Transportation is crucial to ensure that access to essential services such as medical care and grocery shopping.


Full Social Calendar

Mental and social stimulation are key for someone dealing with an Alzheimer's diagnosis.

10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's found here

1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life

One of the most common signs of Alzheimer's is memory loss, especially forgetting recently learned information. Others include forgetting important dates or events; asking for the same information over and over; increasingly needing to rely on memory aids (e.g., reminder notes or electronic devices) or family members for things they used to handle on their own.

What's a typical age-related change? 
Sometimes forgetting names or appointments, but remembering them later.

2. Challenges in planning or solving problems

Some people may experience changes in their ability to develop and follow a plan or work with numbers. They may have trouble following a familiar recipe or keeping track of monthly bills. They may have difficulty concentrating and take much longer to do things than they did before.

What's a typical age-related change?
Making occasional errors when balancing a checkbook.

3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work or at leisure

People with Alzheimer's often find it hard to complete daily tasks. Sometimes, people may have trouble driving to a familiar location, managing a budget at work or remembering the rules of a favorite game.

What's a typical age-related change?
Occasionally needing help to use the settings on a microwave or to record a television show.

4. Confusion with time or place

People with Alzheimer's can lose track of dates, seasons and the passage of time. They may have trouble understanding something if it is not happening immediately. Sometimes they may forget where they are or how they got there.

What's a typical age-related change?
Getting confused about the day of the week but figuring it out later.

5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships

For some people, having vision problems is a sign of Alzheimer's. They may have difficulty reading, judging distance and determining color or contrast, which may cause problems with driving.

What's a typical age-related change?
Vision changes related to cataracts.

6. New problems with words in speaking or writing

People with Alzheimer's may have trouble following or joining a conversation. They may stop in the middle of a conversation and have no idea how to continue or they may repeat themselves. They may struggle with vocabulary, have problems finding the right word or call things by the wrong name (e.g., calling a "watch" a "hand-clock").

What's a typical age-related change?
Sometimes having trouble finding the right word.

7. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps

A person with Alzheimer's disease may put things in unusual places. They may lose things and be unable to go back over their steps to find them again. Sometimes, they may accuse others of stealing. This may occur more frequently over time.

What's a typical age-related change?
Misplacing things from time to time and retracing steps to find them.

8. Decreased or poor judgment

People with Alzheimer's may experience changes in judgment or decision-making. For example, they may use poor judgment when dealing with money, giving large amounts to telemarketers. They may pay less attention to grooming or keeping themselves clean.

What's a typical age-related change?
Making a bad decision once in a while.

9. Withdrawal from work or social activities

A person with Alzheimer's may start to remove themselves from hobbies, social activities, work projects or sports. They may have trouble keeping up with a favorite sports team or remembering how to complete a favorite hobby. They may also avoid being social because of the changes they have experienced.

What's a typical age-related change?
Sometimes feeling weary of work, family and social obligations.

10. Changes in mood and personality

The mood and personalities of people with Alzheimer's can change. They can become confused, suspicious, depressed, fearful or anxious. They may be easily upset at home, at work, with friends or in places where they are out of their comfort zone.

What's a typical age-related change?
Developing very specific ways of doing things and becoming irritable when a routine is disrupted.

1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life

One of the most common signs of Alzheimer's is memory loss, especially forgetting recently learned information. Others include forgetting important dates or events; asking for the same information over and over; increasingly needing to rely on memory aids (e.g., reminder notes or electronic devices) or family members for things they used to handle on their own.

What's a typical age-related change? 
Sometimes forgetting names or appointments, but remembering them later.

2. Challenges in planning or solving problems

Some people may experience changes in their ability to develop and follow a plan or work with numbers. They may have trouble following a familiar recipe or keeping track of monthly bills. They may have difficulty concentrating and take much longer to do things than they did before.

What's a typical age-related change?
Making occasional errors when balancing a checkbook.

3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work or at leisure

People with Alzheimer's often find it hard to complete daily tasks. Sometimes, people may have trouble driving to a familiar location, managing a budget at work or remembering the rules of a favorite game.

What's a typical age-related change?
Occasionally needing help to use the settings on a microwave or to record a television show.

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Please call us for a free consultation

704-528-4568

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 h8-icon2We are closer than you think serving Iredell and all surrounding counties.



1372 Eufola Road Statesville, NC 28677

Alzheimer's, dementia and memory care are often provided in a secure assisted living or nursing home setting, usually in a separate floor or wing. Residents may live in semi-private apartments or private rooms and have structured activities delivered by staff members trained specifically on caring for those with memory impairment.

Memory Care: Differences Between Dementia and Alzheimer's
Alzheimer's disease is a specific form of dementia. As Alzheimer's disease or dementia progresses, the level of care and assistance a person requires increases. While many families prefer to keep their loved one home for as long as possible, a person who suffers from dementia and Alzheimer's will eventually require 24-hour supervised care in catered settings.
For example, Alzheimer's living environments have secured areas to prevent wandering; a common symptom of the disease. And typically, residents in memory care need help with medications, bathing, grooming eating dressing and other daily tasks. Memory care provides intensive, long-term medical care to seniors with serious health and dementia conditions in a fully-staffed and monitored facility.

Memory care requires a larger staff to resident ratio and additional training to ensure the safety of all the residents, therefore the cost is usually higher than other communities. Costs may vary, depending on the following factors:

  • Level of care needed
  • Size of room
  • Whether a room is private or semi-private
  • Geographical location of the community

According to Genworth.com, in 2012, the national average cost of memory care for a single resident was almost $5,000 a month. This cost does vary widely by care facility, however. For example, some communities were as low as $1,500 per month and other communities as high as $7,000 per month.
Services Offered in Memory Care
Memory care offers 24-hour supervised care with meals, activities and health management for residents.
Here are some of the basic services offered in memory care:

  • Comfortable private, or semi-private, rooms
  • Daily meals
  • Housekeeping and laundry service
  • Medication management 
  • Exercise and physical therapy programs
  • Social programs and activities
  • 24-hour staffing and personal assistance